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 #1 
It seems like the most common step, after taking and passing the GED, is to take classes at a local community college, but if you aren't ready for that, what is the next step?
 
I'm worried that even if I manage to actually pass the GED, I'll never be able to handle even basic classes.
Leonard Williams
 #2 
Your next step really depends on your ultimate goal. Where do you want to go? What do you want to become? If you're looking to earn a bachelor's degree, your community college is a great stepping stone (cost effective, close to home, and intended as an inroad into higher education for everyone in the community). And of course, if you want an AA or vocational certification, your community college can get you where you want to go. That's why they're so popular with GED grads. Many community colleges have basic skills classes that are aimed at preparing you for college courses, so check it out. Just like studying for the GED, start out with something that's not too difficult for you, so you can get used to the college environment and what's expected.

Look into the programs that really interest you. Classes that are in line with your interests and talents are going to be easier for you, and if you're interested in training for a job (nursing, electrician, etc.), you might find that you can go into a vocational program that fits into your skill set and makes the college transition easier.

One thing that you can do to prepare is to aim higher than just passing the GED. Aim for a higher score, and put in the extra effort to improve. The reading skills, writing skills, critical thinking skills, and math skills that the GED demands really are the basics for your higher education. If you can get a "4" on the GED essay, you'll be much better prepared than if you skim by with a "2."

Also, lock down your study skills. When you study for the GED, focus on learning how to study, how to manage your time, how to get more out of what you're reading, and how to remember what you've read. It'll help you study better, and you'll be a step up on other college students if you have good study skills. Check your community college for study skills courses, too, as well as a tutoring center. When you get to the college, you'll want to take advantage of all the resources they offer.

You also might look into adult schools in your area. Adult schools often fill a void between high school and college, and like a community college, you can take inexpensive classes to help you prepare.

By the way, you can pass the GED. You're asking intelligent questions... you're a good communicator in a written format. I can tell you've got a lot going for you.

Good studying!
Leonard Williams
The GED Academy
?
 #3 
I know that I want to further my education, but I'm not really sure what I want to do. I know that I want to do something that I'm interested in and will be able to enjoy. Unfortunately, (as far as I know) the things I'm interested in aren't offered at my local community college, so that doesn't really seem like much of an option.

I looked on Google and didn't see any adult schools in my area, only a community college.

I really appreciate all of the help you've given me. I seem to be the only one that's not sure I can do this, everyone else thinks that I can. And thank you for the compliment; I've always considered myself horrible at communicating with other people, especially in written format.
christian
 #4 
What should i do. 
 Should i quit my job to study for ged ?
Cause i have like no time to really study for ged.
Kirsten
 #5 
Hi Christian,

   I know life can really get in the way sometimes and it's tough to figure out how you'll be able to squeeze in some GED study time. That's one of the best things about GED Academy; it's a self-paced study program so you can study for the GED whenever you have a moment. In fact, if you could find a way to study just one hour a week, you could be ready for your test in 3-4 months.

   I'd be happy to answer any additional questions you may have about GED Academy if you'd like to email me or give us a call at the number below.

You're also more than welcome to enroll in the program any time from here: http://www.passged.com/online_courses.php

I hope that helps!

-- 
Kirsten Thomas
GED Specialist
GED Academy
kirsten@passged.com
http://www.passged.com
1-800-460-8150


Jaya
 #6 
Hi,
I am going to sit for my GED test this coming December,i have  a hope that i will pass be course i did high school back home in Africa but i didnt complete,so what my tutor here is doing is just just refreshing what i have most learned before.
My question is i really wanna try get Vocational training like engineering be course i am good on using my hand,fix  car many times before myself when it had some small problems but i dont wanna do Auto Mechanical Engineering.
Please any idea after my GED what i should go for with high jobs demands,that what i am looking for.
Thanks a lot
Jaya
Kirsten
 #7 
Hi Jaya, I like to hear you already have some ideas of what you'd like to do after you get your GED. It sounds like you should start researching some college and/or career programs that specialize in the area you're interested in. And while you're at it, you can ask if they have certain requirements regarding the GED. Some schools prefer certain test scores.

Kirsten Thomas
GED Academy
1-800-460-8150
dianna
 #8 
Im getting my ged in like three months, going to classes to study and stuff like that. After I get my ged, what do i do? I want to be a computer technician and i honestly dont know what i should do? Like do i go to community college and get certificates or what?
Christina
 #9 

Hi Dianna,

First of all, congratulations on your commitment to furthering your education! It can be challenging, but will prove to be very rewarding. If you are interested in using an online program to study for the test, we can help you with that. You can visit our website for more information, here: http://www.passged.com/free-ged-tools.php

As far as what to do after you obtain your certificate, there are several options you can choose. It looks like, to be a computer technician, you are not required to have a degree. However, if you are not already very knowledgeable about computers, it would probably benefit you to at least take some courses on it, if not actually get a degree.

Here are links to some articles about becoming a computer technician. Hopefully these will give you some insight about that career path:


http://money.howstuffworks.com/how-to-become-a-computer-technician.htm

http://www.citytowninfo.com/education-articles/career-guides/how-to-become-a-computer-technician

http://www.thetechmentor.com/posts/9-tips-help-you-become-computer-technician/

It sounds like you have some flexibility in how you choose to go about this. A good place to start might be to look into computer classes at your local community college. You can also speak with teachers at the college to find out more information about that career.

I hope this was helpful! Best of luck to you!

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